Live updates: Americans rally for the death of Mark George Floyd

Darnella Frazier, the young woman who pulled out her cell phone on a Minneapolis street to record a video of a white policeman as he knelt on George Floyd’s neck ricocheting around the world, posted Tuesday a powerful statement on the occasion of the first anniversary of Mr. Floyd’s death.

“A year ago, today I witnessed a murder. The victim’s name was George Floyd, ”she wrote in a Facebook message. “I knew his life mattered. I knew he was in pain. I knew he was another black man in danger with no power.

Ms Frazier was only 17 at the time, she said, and accompanied her 9-year-old cousin to the convenience store, unaware of how drastically her life would change.

“It changed me. It changed my way of seeing life. It made me realize how dangerous it is to be black in America, ”she wrote. “We shouldn’t have to trample on cops, the same people who are supposed to protect and serve.”

Ms Frazier, who is now 18, recounted her experiences after Mr Floyd’s murder. She would wake up with reporters at her door. She didn’t sleep well for weeks and shivered so badly at night that her mother had to rock her to sleep. She had panic and anxiety attacks every time she saw a police car.

Although it’s a little easier now, she says, she nevertheless carries the burden of this day with her.

“I still carry the weight and trauma of what I witnessed a year ago,” she said. “Part of my childhood was taken from me.”

Ms Frazier recorded the video and uploaded it to Facebook, sparking international protests against racism and police abuse. She testified at the trial of agent, Derek Chauvin, and said in March that she regretted not having physically engaged the agents, but that they were ultimately at fault.

Many people refer to her as a hero, she noted in her statement on Tuesday. But she doesn’t see herself as such – she was just in the right place at the right time, she said.

“Behind that smile, behind these awards, behind the publicity, I’m a girl trying to heal from something that reminds me of every day,” she said. “Everyone’s talking about the girl who recorded George Floyd’s death, but actually being her is another story.

She added, “My video didn’t save George Floyd, but it got his killer off the streets.”

And at the end of her message, she spoke directly to Mr. Floyd.

“George Floyd, I can’t express enough how I wish things had turned out differently, but I want you to know that you will always be in my heart,” Ms. Frazier wrote. “I will always remember this day because of you. May your soul rest in peace. May you rest in the most beautiful roses. “

Here is his full statement:

A year ago, today I witnessed a murder. The victim’s name was George Floyd. Although it is not the first time that I have seen a black man being killed at the hands of the police, it is the first time that I have witnessed it in front of me.

Right in front of my eyes, a few steps away. I didn’t know this man in a paint bucket, but I knew his life mattered. I knew he was in pain. I knew he was another black man in danger with no power.

I was only 17 at the time, just a normal day to walk my 9 year old cousin to the convenience store, not even prepared for what I was about to see, not even knowing my life was going to change on that point exact. day in those precise moments… he did. It changed me.

It changed my way of seeing life. It made me realize how dangerous it is to be black in America. We shouldn’t have to walk on eggshells around the police, the same people who are supposed to protect and serve. We are considered thugs, animals and criminals, all because of the color of our skin. Why are blacks the only people seen this way when every race has a type of fault? None of us should judge. We are all human. I’m 18 now and still carry the weight and trauma of what I witnessed a year ago. It’s a little easier now, but I’m not what I used to be.

Part of my childhood was taken from me. My 9 year old cousin, who witnessed the same thing as me, separated from her childhood. Having to get up and leave because my house was no longer safe, wake up to reporters at my door, close my eyes at night only to see a man who is brown like me, lifeless on the floor.

I couldn’t sleep properly for weeks. I used to shake so hard at night my mom had to rock me to sleep. Jump from hotel to hotel because we didn’t have a home and look over our backs every day in the process. Having panic and anxiety attacks every time I saw a police car, not knowing who to trust as a lot of people are mean with bad intentions. I hold this weight.

A lot of people call me a hero even though I don’t see myself as one. I was just in the right place at the right time. Behind that smile, behind these awards, behind the publicity, I’m a girl trying to heal from something that reminds me of every day.

Everyone’s talking about the girl who recorded George Floyd’s death, but actually being her is another story. Not only did it affect me, but also my family. We have all experienced changes. My mom the most. I strive every day to be strong for her because she was strong for me when I couldn’t be strong for myself.

Even though it was a traumatic experience that changed my life, I am proud of myself. Without my video, the world wouldn’t have known the truth. I own this. My video didn’t save George Floyd, but it got his killer off the streets.

Can you see George Floyd the way you want, despite his past, because we don’t all have one? He was a loved one, someone’s son, someone’s father, someone’s brother, and someone’s friend. We the people won’t take the blame, you won’t point fingers at us like it’s our fault, like we’re criminals. I don’t think people understand how bad death is … this person never comes back.

These officers should not be deciding whether someone can live or not. It is time for these agents to start being held accountable. Murdering people and abusing your power by doing it is not doing your job. It shouldn’t force people to go through something to figure out it’s wrong. It’s called having a heart and understanding right from wrong.

George Floyd, I can’t express enough how I wish things had turned out differently, but I want you to know that you will always be in my heart. I will always remember this day because of you. May your soul rest in peace. May you rest in the most beautiful roses. – Darnella Frazier

About Raymond Lang

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